Whatever the success rate is of achieving goals... that's really just one of the many "LoA" side effects, not LoA itself. Duh. And it largely depends on how people go about it anyway, and we all know how good people are at understanding "LoA"... just look at your own article HAHAHAHAHAHAH (it's pretty damn funny to be honest). Most are looking for shortcuts when they set goals. That's still "LoA" btw... when they don't achieve those goals.
The financial newspaper Investors Business Daily (IBD) asked these same questions a few years ago and started a multi-year search for the answer. They studied industry leaders, investors and entrepreneurs to understand the traits they all had in common that contributed to their success. Reproduced here is their list of 10 Secrets to Success along with my commentary on each no-so-secret, ‘secret’.
i must say that this article brings alot of ideas to the grinding mill of knowledge. in my own opinion,I strongly believe that success starts from the inside. so also is failure. if you hold it strongly that you are successful, you are the one that measures it first, even when people see or say that you are a failure. in other words, as you think in your heart, so are you- the greatest book tells us! turning many failure to success is an indication that the one who tries to succeed believed that he will succeed, so it is that mindset that most likely fires him up to turn the failure into success. this is usually true of many entrepreneur who usually started hard. http://dfwbankruptcylawyer.com/services/

Loved your kindle book! It’s given me hope and most importantly a sense of serenity which I haven’t had since my breakup I’m afraid. Moving on is never as easy as one thinks. People tell you to go out with friends, have fun etc…But how does one go out and “have fun” when all restaurants, bars, lounges, clubs or car radios play music and music is the last thing you even want to listen to when your heart is breaking in a million pieces. So that alone, prevents one from moving on peacefully. But your book…I don’t know, just gives one hope. It is easier (at least for me) to “let go” knowing that getting back with the love of my life is possible. Frankly, moving on with hope, regardless of the result, is so much healthier than without it. So for that alone thanks! Now my question :))… I haven’t see my ex for the past two months. He’s very very reluctant to speak to me, and the very limited email exchanges we have had since the breakup have been cold (on his end) at best, though he does reply everytime. I know he is hurt and dealing with it in his won male way I guess…We are thousands of miles away from each other and I want to manfiest spending christmas together. Is is advisable to manifest a certain date? Does that give it more power, or takes away from manifestation? I dont’ want to be obsessive about it, I want to be easy about it, but I must say that this Xmas was supposed to be special for us and I would love for that to be the case eventough it is around the corner. It just seems that manifesting an ex back is almost more difficult than manifesting a specific person you know but have never had a relationship with…Probably because of all the baggage and history. So anyway I just wanted to know if a specific date is ok? Thank you so much :))

Your book says that one must let the person they love miss them. In my case, things are fine between us and we are great friends. I have no reason to avoid him or not talk to him. Then what is it that I can do to make him miss me? Also, is it really important to maintain distance for LOA to work? Can I continue talking to him everyday like I always have and still manifest an ideal relationship with him?

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7) No Compassion: Don’t get involved with anything negative like charity or helping the needy. This will attract more negativity and poverty. Wallace Wattles, a LOA founder wrote, “Do not talk about poverty; do not investigate it, or concern yourself with it. Do not spend your time in charitable work, or charity movements, all charity only tends to perpetuate the wretchedness it aims to eradicate.” and “Give your attention wholly to riches; ignore poverty.” Rhonda Byrne in The Secret takes this a step further, “If you see people who are overweight, do not observe them…If you think or talk about diseases, you will become sick. What you think or surround yourself with – good or bad, is what you will bring upon yourself.” If you believe in a LOA avoid any of the “helping or health” professions such as physician, nurse, hospital worker, clergy, psychologist, police officer, paramedic, etc. Avoid professions in which you deal with poor people such as accountant, mortgage broker, banker, lawyer, etc. While research shows that charitable work, empathy and volunteering is beneficial to both the giver and receiver, avoid these things if you believe in a LOA.
If you’re practicing the technique on something bigger, this exercise may be tricky, but use your imagination. If you’re trying to lose weight, go out and buy an outfit that fits the size you’re aiming for. If you want a new car, go to a dealership and shop around. If you’re aiming for something as big as complete financial freedom, start planning what you’re going to do with all that free time and money.
Ever notice how travel magazines show a beautiful destination, maybe a white sand beach and azure blue sky? And, there is always a table and empty chair. Your mind is attracted to the empty chair. It wants you to be there. Goals are the same. The law of attraction is energised by the gap between here and there. So long as it is bridgeable (see tip 21).
Ten years later, they revisited the same Harvard MBA students to assess their results. The 13% of the class that had set goals but didn’t have them in writing were earning, on average, twice as much as the 84% of the class that had set no goals at all. However, it was the 3% of the class that had both set written goals in writing and had a plan for their attainment that astonished the researchers.
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