The journey of welcoming your Soulmate is a journey towards your authentic nature.  It’s not a journey of finding somebody who is going to love you, make you happy, or give you something that you don’t already have, but rather it is a journey of growing yourself and your own capacity to love yourself first before you can love others or welcome and recognize their love.  It is about becoming more yourself, doing all the necessary clearing out, and embracing all the darker, subtle, shadow aspects of yourself that you’ve been unwilling to look at.
Skeptical Inquirer magazine criticized the lack of falsifiability and testability of these claims.[47] Critics have asserted that the evidence provided is usually anecdotal and that, because of the self-selecting nature of the positive reports, as well as the subjective nature of any results, these reports are susceptible to confirmation bias and selection bias.[48] Physicist Ali Alousi, for instance, criticized it as unmeasurable and questioned the likelihood that thoughts can affect anything outside the head.[1]

Hi Matt – You have to be willing to forgive her. Not forgiving her is not forgiving yourself for allowing what happened to happen. Wanting her to reconcile with you only creates more wanting. You say you want her to come back to you, but you push her away and ignore her. You’re not in alignment with getting her back. You’re in alignment with not having her in your life. If you really want her back, you have to give her a chance. Read through the articles listed in this article for more tips.

It’s quite clear that success has nothing to do with our initial set of circumstances. Some of the most poor and disadvantaged people in the world have achieved the greatest successes of all time. Oprah Winfrey was born to a single mother on welfare and was physically and sexually abused as a child. J.K. Rowling was divorced, had a daughter, and was living on government assistance before publishing the first book in the Harry Potter series.
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