Of course, it is possible to make some broad generalizations. For starters, successful people tend to be good at what they do – although, even here, exceptions exist since some business people, for example, have been regarded as highly successful individuals while determinedly leading their companies down the road to ruin. Additionally, successful people are generally not lazy since becoming successful does require you to do something (even if turns out that you’re ultimately not that good at what that something is). I also happen to think – and it’s a controversial point – that a good dose of intelligence (even if it’s not traditional academic intelligence) does help quite a bit.


Although we are naturally desirous of material things, as Christians our perspective on life must be revolutionized (Romans 12:2). Just as we become new creations when we come to Christ (2 Corinthians 5:17), so must our understanding of “abundance” be transformed. True abundant life consists of an abundance of love, joy, peace, and the rest of the fruits of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22-23), not an abundance of “stuff.” It consists of life that is eternal, and, therefore, our interest is in the eternal, not the temporal. Paul admonishes us, “Set your minds on things above, not on earthly things. For you died, and your life is now hidden with Christ in God” (Colossians 3:2-3).
Matchmaker, Matchmaker Bring Me My Match: The bottom line is that you attract to yourself that which you think about (a lot). There is no judgement call involved about whether a particular thought is "good" or "bad" or whether its corresponding circumstance is "deserved" or "undeserved". The Law of Attraction is neutral. It does not judge, punish or reward. It simply serves to bring like energy together. Think of it as the great matchmaker. You submit your criteria via your habitual thoughts and beliefs and it brings you your perfect vibratory match, every time.

Or, like most people who claim to have found the way to manifest things through the LOA, is it that you truly don't want big things, new things, nice cars, paid off mansions, kids' schools paid for, permanent paid vacations, etc. If you wanted them, you know you could manifest them, you are just not that interested in those things right now. That's the typical response.
“All student athletes and their mentors should read this book. It brings into focus the challenges and the opportunities inherent in being a collegiate athlete. Most importantly, it outlines a framework for how to successfully navigate the landscape and develop an outstanding life plan.”—Deborah A. Yow, Director of Athletics, North Carolina State University
Gerry Ellen is an author, creative storyteller, and wellness advocate. She enjoys sharing her experiences of life, love, and all things meaningful and healthy through words and images. She is a regular contributor to MeetMindful, Be You Media Group, Tattooed Buddha, and Rebelle Society. As a former featured columnist on elephant journal and Light Workers World, she considers her love of nature and the outdoors, heart-centered connections, friends and family, and traveling to explore and expand as the epicenter of her world. She is extremely driven with her service work through 8 Paws Wellness with her dog, Scout. Gerry Ellen has authored and published two books, Ripple Effects (March 2012) and A Big Piece of Driftwood (April 2014), which are both available on Amazon.com

While you’ve likely asked yourself this question before, and more than likely you’ve read or heard about it somewhere, the discussion still beckons us. So what is the secret to success in life? How can we achieve our wildest dreams over time without getting discouraged? How can we match our actions with our words, follow through, and persist until we achieve wild success?
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