However, I recognize that certain particular accomplishments tend to mean success to most people. These are: finding a job and a career that has status in our society and that brings with it enough financial reward that it is possible to live comfortably. This is the familiar picture of a house with a picket fence. The particular kind of work they will engage in will otherwise vary widely. Part of this success—in the eyes of most people—is a loving family, usually including children--and good friends. And having a place in the community.
When we don’t treat ourselves well, that is a sign of low self-esteem; it sends a message we are not ‘worthy’ of love and care. And guess what will be reflected back into your reality? Taking better care of yourself, and treating yourself with the respect and love you deserve, will help shore up beliefs that say ‘I am good enough.’ ‘I deserve someone who treats me well.’
It’s quite clear that success has nothing to do with our initial set of circumstances. Some of the most poor and disadvantaged people in the world have achieved the greatest successes of all time. Oprah Winfrey was born to a single mother on welfare and was physically and sexually abused as a child. J.K. Rowling was divorced, had a daughter, and was living on government assistance before publishing the first book in the Harry Potter series.
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